And…..Done. Final Blog Post

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It’s hard to believe I’ve been running my blog for 6 years now, even more difficult to believe that I’ve done 282 posts in that time period.  But, as they say, all good things must come to an end, and I’ve decided that now is a good time for me to step away from the blog and focus on other avenues for sharing my views on creativity and audio production.

It’s been really enjoyable talking to everyone and sharing your views on how you approach all the struggles and joys of writing music.  I can’t thank everyone enough for all the insightful comments, indepth replies, and most especially for all the donations you’ve made to help make all this possible.

As a way of saying thanks one final time, I’ve collected all of the best blog posts into one document, which you can download here:

BEST BITS OF THE BLOG (Zip File)

The zip file contains both PDF and epub versions of the document so you can view it on any of your devices.  I’ve made a few changes here in there in the text to update my recommendations on gear, and make it easier to read all of the posts front to back.

Thanks again everyone!
Tarekith

Ableton Loop Review

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I love it when something comes along and the timing just couldn’t be any better. For the last few months I’ve been in a bit of a creative rut, which as followers of my blog know is really not all that uncommon for me. Still, when I was invited to Ableton’s Loop conference this past weekend, an event designed to foster creativity, I have to admit part of me breathed a huge sigh of relief. Perhaps this was something that could kick start my ideas again. As this was an event with very limited attendance, I thought I’d give a brief overview of the weekend for those that couldn’t be there themselves. If you haven’t heard of this event yet, here’s all the details:

https://loop.ableton.com

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Loop was held at Radialsystem V in the heart of Berlin, a large venue with main auditorium for the main presentations, a huge room set up with all sorts of electronic music gear for people to play with, and multiple smaller workshops on the four floors above. While it was obviously an event hosted by Ableton, they made it clear that it was not an event supposed to be ABOUT Ableton. There were many other manufacturers there with gear for people to try, some of the more common ones like Roland and Elektron, a large selection of modular errr…. modules, as well as some more esoteric and experimental bits of gear. It was a nice way to check out things you might not have gotten any hands on time with in-between the talks and workshops.

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I won’t go over all of the workshops and presentations, as I only made it to a few of them due to spending so much time talking to other musicians, producers, and developers through out Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Not to mention quite a few people I’ve known “virtually” for years who work at Ableton, it was a good chance to put a face to the names at last.

There were a few highlights I can talk about from the presentations I did manage to see however.

Friday Robert Henke gave a keynote about the power of failure to drive success. Despite being sick as a dog, he did an excellent job setting the tone for the weekend, and have one of the best quotes I heard all weekend when he said “Success points to your past, failure points to your future”. Meaning, it’s nice to have success, but if you’re only ever chasing that, it leads you to keep repeating the same things over and over. Risking failure forces you to expand your ideas and try new things, or work improve on those things you know you can’t achieve yet. A simple statement, but powerful.

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On Saturday there was panel discussion about creating new instruments and ways to play music with Gerhard Behles (Ableton), Carla Scaletti (Symbolic Sound/Kyma), Stephan Schmitt (NI Founder), and Roger Linn. Good insight into the thought processes about how they designed the equipment they’re most known for. I thought it was nice that they all answered honestly about what they consider their biggest failures so far. For Stephan it was the fact that Guitar Rig never caught on as a stage tool for guitarists, Gerhard said he regretted the way Grooves was implemented in Live, and Carla said she is always making mistakes in order to learn and improve from them.

Roger Linn won the discussion though when he said “Remember in the 80’s when music got sterile, lost it’s human feel, alienated musicians around the world, and made people discount electronic music for decades to come? Yeah, that was my fault”. He was referring to inventing quantization, but it still got a good laugh from everyone in the crowd.

The highlight of Saturday for me were the two panels that Young Guru was a part of. I admit, while I had heard of him and knew he was a well-known engineer in the hop hop world, I didn’t realize just HOW famous he was, nor the sheer number of classic albums he had a direct hand in. Despite this, he was so down to earth and eager to share his views on all things related to music, not just in the panels, but while walking around and talking to people before and after too. And better yet, did so in a very inspiring way. I think a lot of people were really impressed with what he had to share, I know I was. Most of the events at Loop were recorded, when Ableton eventually posts them online,I highly recommend watching the Young Guru ones.

Sunday started off with a bang, literally. The panel was about acoustic drummers and how they adapt to working with electronic music. It featured Katharina Ernst, Kiran Gandhi, and Zach Danziger, each with their own drum kits on stage. Aside from being a LOUD way to wake up on a Sunday morning, they were all such different drummers that there was a huge range of knowledge and technique they shared about all things rhythm. They closed it out with all three of them jamming at once too, by far the loudest event of the weekend by amazing to listen to.

Of course Sunday was also about the big Push 2 and Live 9.5 announcement as well, and really was a great way to wrap up the conference. The Ableton presenters did a great job of showing off the new features, and when gerhard said they would be offering a 30% discount if you traded in your Push 1 and they would then donate those to schools, the place erupted with a standing ovation. The music industry really needs more initiatives like this.

You can view the video of the Push 2, Live 9.5, and Link announcement here: https://vimeo.com/144372872.

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After the conference was over each day, there was a music event that was free for everyone to attend each night. While all the music performed wasn’t always the stuff I’d listen to normally, I think it was all well chosen to show the more experimental side of of electronic music. Really cutting edge stuff, sometimes ambient modular noodlings married to visuals, other times harsh and thunderous bass tones in a pitch black room synced to steam cannons. I think these were recorded as well, so rather than try to describe such esoteric music with words, I’ll wait and let you see/hear for yourself when these come out.

More than anything though, I think what I liked about Loop was that it got people from a lot of different backgrounds into the same room, and gave them a chance to share ideas and find new collaborators for their own projects. It also was interesting to see the same themes come up over and over, both in the official presentations, and just talking to people outside in-between the workshops. Things like:

– Making music is not always fun, especially if you’re a professional. There’s times you just need to plow through and get it done even if it sucks at the time. It IS work after all, you can’t just wait for the fun moments all the time.

– Limitations are good, both in terms of the gear you use and time constraints.

– If you want to get good at writing songs, you need to actually finish as many as you can and release them to the world. Wrap up, move on, and curate any feedback you get to improve things the next time around. Team Supreme’s weekly beat-making contests were a great example. Write a one minute long beat in 30 minutes once a week and post it online. Brilliant.

– If you’re having problems writing music with the gear available today, it’s not the gear, it’s you. Young Guru’s quote on how a craftsman doesn’t blame his tools, and that everything you use can achieve professional results with the right mindset.

– Working with other people always leads to better results than working alone. Maybe a bit controversial for me personally, but it’s something I heard repeated again and again.

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Despite three days of late nights and early mornings, I came away from Loop reinvigorated like I had hoped. It was a chance to see how other people work, not just with the same tools I have, but how they struggle and overcome the same barriers to making music. A reminder that as artists we all go through the same problems, and that sometimes you just need to stop whining and get on with things to push through them.

I was very excited to hear Gerhard hint at Loop 2016 at the end of the weekend, I for one really hope I can make it back again. Thanks to everyone at Ableton for putting on such an incredible weekend, this was definitely one of the most enjoyable music-related weekends I’ve ever had. It’s left me really excited to get back to my own music-making, as soon as I can kick this cold anyway 🙂

Peace and beats,
Tarekith

Getting The Most From Professional Mastering

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As someone who’s been fortunate enough to master thousands of songs for other artists over the last 16 years, I’ve seen firsthand how much of a difference professional mastering can make to an artist’s song. However, every once in awhile the artist might not get exactly what they wanted. As this is usually down to communication and preparation and easily remedied, I thought it might be worth sharing some ideas on the best way to get the most out of your first time working with a professional Mastering Engineer.

1. The happier you are with your mix, the happier you’re going to be with the mastering. While we can sometimes make dramatic changes to the sound of mixdown, it’s important to remember that the goal of mastering is not to radically change the sound of your song. If there are problems in your mix that you know are keeping you from being happy with it, do your best to solve those prior to sending it for mastering.

If you’re at a loss for how to do this after trying for awhile, reach out to the Mastering Engineer you plan on working with and see if they can offer some quick pointers. Often times when we hear the song in our calibrated listening environments, we can spot issues and offer suggestions very quickly. Just remember you’re paying your Mastering Engineer (M.E.) to master your song, not provide weeks and weeks of mix advice, so try not to take advantage of what many mastering engineers consider a bit of free help.

On that note, not all mixdowns need tweaking prior to mastering either! Don’t be offended if the M.E. doesn’t come back with a list of changes to make. I find that often times artists are too self-conscious about their work, and think their mixdowns are lacking, when usually they are great as is!

2. Make sure you are sending the correct file, in the format the M.E. requests. You’d think it would be common knowledge at this point, but people still send MP3s to be mastered instead of uncompressed wavs or aiff files. Most Mastering Engineers prefer 24 or 32bit files, at the same sample-rate as the DAW project file. There are very few exceptions when exporting a mixdown at a higher sample-rate sounds better.  At best it might sound a little different, at worst it might actually sound worse than a lower sample-rate. Talk to your M.E. and see what they prefer so you’re both on the same page.

On that note, double check that the file you are sending is correct. Don’t just look at the waveform after it’s rendered, listen to it all the way from start to finish to ensure you’re sending them exactly what you think you’re sending. Often times mistakes happen because a track might have been accidentally muted, or perhaps the artist mistakenly sent a previous version of the mix they had been working on. Save everyone the hassle of having to redo the work by giving it one last listen before you send it in.

3. Give yourself plenty of time to get the most out of the mastering experience. Often as deadlines loom, it can be easy to let the mastering slip until the very last minute. Not only does this leave less time for any possible revisions to be made, but as artists we rarely make things sound the best while under the gun. I often tell my clients to take a couple days completely away from the mixdown when they think they are done (when possible), and then do that final listening check. Usually any mix issues you might have missed after weeks of focusing on the song are instantly recognizable with fresh ears.

4. Communication is key, both before and after the mastering session. Remember, we’re here to serve you! If you don’t tell us what you’re expecting, or what kind of issues you think the song has compared to your vision, we’ll never know. Don’t be afraid to send along a couple reference tracks you think your song can end up sounding like, or even just a few notes about what kind of sound you’re going for.

Likewise, if you get the master back and it’s not what you were expecting, let the Mastering Engineer know! Most offer a couple of free revisions, and usually once we know what it is you’re after, it’s easy to get the tracks where they need to be on the next pass. Again, we’re here to help you the artist achieve your goals, so don’t be embarrassed to ask for a few changes. Trust me, it happens more than you would think and most Mastering Engineers are only too happy to oblige. Ditto if you need different formats like MP3, DDPs, or MFiT compatible versions.

As you can see, none of this is really that complicated.  By taking a few steps to ensure you’re sending the best mixdown you can and communicating with the M.E. you choose to work with, the whole process should go smoothly for both parties. I’ll be the first to admit that not all songs need professional mastering. But when you’re ready to take that next step, keep these tips in mind and enjoy the difference an experienced engineer can make to the art you’ve spent so much time crafting. I think most people are more surprised by the results than they expected!

Peace and beats,
Tarekith

Tarekith Turns Ten

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Kind of weird how the date almost slipped by me, but as I was preparing my entire back-catalog for Bandcamp, I noticed that it had been almost exactly ten years since I started using the name Tarekith for my music-making.  Time flies and all that.

I have to say, going back through all the tracks I’ve written over the last ten years has been a real trip.  So many simularities I can make out, and at the same time I was exploring all manner of gear and workflows continuously.  Plus there was a consistancy to my output that surprised me, bar one or two years where life events intervened.  It’s been a lot of fun hearing stuff I wrote that I practically forgot about 🙂

Anyway, as I mention, this all came about because I wanted to get all of my tracks and live sets online somewhere not just for people to buy, but also lossless as a form of additional backup if you will.  I’ve been really happy with Bandcamp over the last few years, so I figured that was the best place to start.  Eventually I’ll get them all on the primary retailers like iTunes, Amazon, etc, but for now Bandcamp it is:

https://tarekith.bandcamp.com

The tracks and live sets are group by year into invidual albums, and each album is only $1.  You can of course pay more if you want.

The album covers are all pictures I took over the last ten years, each one in the same year of the album just for fun.  Kinda fun for me to see those too, lots of places all over the world, who would have thought I’d be a world traveller some day?

Enjoy the music, and thanks to everyone who’s supported me, my music, and this blog over the last 10 years.

Peace and chill beats,
Tarekith

Over-engineering Musical Solutions

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One of the more interesting aspects of living in Europe compared to the US, is how differently they build things.  Lots more concrete, no drywall, attention to air quality inside, more stringent energy saving devices, etc.  Of course, sometimes better is not always better.

Case in point.  The bathroom in our new apartment has a fan and vent system that’s tied into the overhead light.  When you turn on the main bathroom light, after a few seconds the fans in the vents start.  This provides not only fresh air, but also helps get rid of any moisture in the air after say a shower, preventing mold building up and the like.  It’s a great idea on paper, however the people who designed it over-engineered the concept because said fan will stay on for up to 30 minutes after you turn off the light.  Even if you only turn on the light for a few seconds.  And it’s very loud, so loud you can hear it in all of the other rooms.  To the point where it’s extremely annoying, and it basically creates a larger problem than it solves.

As a result, instead of being a practical solution we appreciate having and use frequently, my wife and rarely use the overhead light in the bathroom and instead use the much dimmer one built into the wall.    The point of this post isn’t just to whine about my new bathroom though, because I see music producers doing the same thing all the time when it comes to writing music.

For instance, people will be working to make two instruments sit together better in a mix by using some EQ on both parts.   They’ll go to great lengths to create these radical and steep EQ shapes that precisely isolate specific frequencies, and yes the sounds do fit together better afterwards.  But at the same time, they also lack any warmth or presence, making the mix sound thin and anemic.  They’ve in effect not just fixed a problem, but created a worse one in the process.

Another example I’ve seen has to do with a song’s arrangement.  I was mastering some music for a couple of DJs, and they had written their music so that every 8 bars was more or less a perfect loop.  The thinking was that this way DJs could just pick and choose their favorite parts of the song, loop those, and ignore everything else.

It sounds like an interesting idea on paper, but when you’d hear the songs from start to end, they sounded very disjointed and just didn’t flow that well.  It sounded like…. well a collection of loops.  It was doubtful any DJs would buy the tracks in the first place as they were, much less spend time pulling out their favorite loops.  Luckily I was able to make some suggestions to make things flow a little better, and there was still the ability to grab loops of the important parts of the songs if DJs wanted.  We had to un-engineer the tracks if you will.

There’s dozens of other examples we can all think of I’m sure, but point of all this is just to keep in mind that sometimes the best solution is one that is just good enough to fix the problem.  That putting too much thought and planning into something can occasionally take a good idea and turn it into something that lacks the soul that made the idea good in the first place.  It’s good to step back once in awhile and rethink what you’re doing, make sure that it still solves your problem without creating new ones you didn’t perhaps realize were a possibility before.

Too much of a good thing can sometimes be a bad thing as they say.

Until next time, peace and beats.
Erik

Inner Portal Is Open Again

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Well, it’s been a long time coming, but I’m happy to announce that Inner Portal Studio is once again open for business!  My gear arrived in Luxembourg last week, and luckily everything made it safe and sound.  Took me a few days to get everything set up the way I wanted after playing with the location of all my acoustic treatment, but I’m really happy with the way everything is sounding in the new studio now.

I know a lot of my regular clients have been very patiently waiting for me to get back up and running, and I wanted to thank you all for sticking with me during this transition.  I expect that I’ll be pretty busy the first few weeks and that my usual delivery times might be a little bit longer than normal, but I’ll do my best to keep the delays to a minimum while maintaining the same level of quality you have come to expect.

I’m really looking forward to getting back to work, and I can’t wait to work with everyone on all your musical projects for the remainder of 2015.
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Other than working on getting the studio in working order again, it’s been a busy few weeks for me writing music and working on a new live set again.  I decided to revisit some of my more more recent releases, and get them prepped to perform live using only the Traktor S8 controller.  It’s been something I’ve been considering doing since I got the S8 and saw how flexible it is with the remix decks.  So far the project is coming along well, and I’m excited to finally try this new way of performing.  Of course I’ll post more details and hopefully a video of a trial run once I get it all ready for prime time.  🙂

I’m still working away on the Maschine Studio I got (again) a few weeks back too.  I was originally going to try and do a live set using that, but I think for now I’m going to just focus on creating some really strong song foundations first.  Once I get enough for a live set or an album, then I’ll decide which direction I want to take. Busy busy!

Im hoping now that things are starting to settle down with the studio, I can focus on the blog some more too.  I’m always looking for new ideas to discuss here, so if anyone has anything that they think would be interesting, or questions they like to see me address, please put them in the comments as usual.

Thanks!

Peace and beats,
Erik
(Errr…. Tarekith)

New Dither Examples

A few years ago I produced some audio examples of different types of dither, so that people could more easily hear what dither does and what a couple of different dithering options sound like.   As there are even more options for dithering algorithms these days, I figured it was time to update my examples and talk a little bit about what seems to be one of the more confusing aspects of music production for people.  You can download all of the audio examples and graphs I’ll be talking about here:

http://innerportalstudio.com/files/DitherExamples.zip

For these examples, I used a 24bit sample of a ride cymbal with some reverb applied.  I then converted this to 16bit wav files in various DAWs using the dithering options they offer.  Specifically:

– Rectangular, Triangular, POW-r1, POW-r2, POW-r3 from Ableton Live 9.

– The only dithering option in Presonus Studio One.

– UV22HR from Apple Logic Pro X, though it also offers the same POW-r options that Live does.

– Goodhertz dithering from Audiofile Engineering Triumph.

In addition, I also created a 16bit wav file version using no dithering at all, this is called truncating.

The next step was to cut off the all but the very end of the reverb tails of these files, and normalize the remaining portion to -0.5dBFS.  This was done because dither noise is extremely quiet, with all but it’s very peaks around -96dBFS, well below the noise floor of most playback equipment.  Boosting only the tails of the audio files allowed me to raise the overall level of the files to make the dither noise itself audible at normal listening volumes.  These files are located in the folder called “Dithered Ride Tails”.

I recommend listening to the truncated version first, so you can hear what it is we’re trying to achieve with dithering in the first place.  At the very end of the truncated sample, you can hear what sounds like digital noise as the least significant bit toggles on and off trying to replicate the very quiet end of the reverb fading out to silence.  By adding dither noise, we make this last little bit of fade out much smoother and more natural sounding, at the expense of a very tiny bit of noise.

Remember, in these examples I’ve boosted this noise A LOT just to make it audible, in normal use, it’s so quiet as to be almost completely inaudible.  Plus there’s some tricks with dithering to reduce how much of it we hear even more, which I’ll talk about shortly.

I included the full length ride samples without trimming or normalizing as well, in case anyone wants them to hear how dither sounds in more real world situation.  You’ll find them in the folder called “Original Rides”.  Though I highly doubt that many people will be able to hear the dither at all, even on what is arguably one of these best examples for demonstrating it’s purpose.  It’s just extremely quiet, just imagine trying to hear it on a full mix!

In addition to the ride cymbal sample, I also created a 24bit sample of nothing but silence.  This was also converted to 16bit using the above dithering options, but in this case it was so I could provide FFT analyzer images of just the dithering noise itself for visual comparison.  I used DMG Audio’s Dualism plug-in for the FFT analysis.  The scale was set from 20Hz to 20kHz, and from 0 to -144dBFS (effectively 24bits) to make the shape of the dithering algorithms easier to see.  Keep in mind that a 16bit file has only a range to -96dBFS when you look at the graphs, so anything below that will be discarded.  All the graphs are unsurprisingly located in the folder labeled “Graphs”, and you can see them below too (click each for full-sized versions):

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Studio One Dither
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Live TriangularAbleton Live Triangular

Live RectangularAbleton Live Rectangular

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POW-r 1POW-r1

POW-r 2POW-r2

POW-r 3POW-r3

Why are they shaped differently?  That’s one of the tricks I mentioned earlier.  Since our ear is most sensitive around the 2kHz range, the dither noise in the various algorithms is created to be stronger in the frequencies away from this sensitive area.  Most of the time it’s boosted way up by 20kHz, beyond the range of most human hearing, but the actual shape and slope of the boost varies depending the algorithm.

Each manufacturer has what they consider the ideal way of doing this, sometimes, in the case of POW-r, with different options for different kinds of music. You can hear this in the subtle tonality of the noise in some of the different dither examples, as well as seeing the exact shape in the graphs I provided.  Some of the options like Ableton’s Triangular and Rectangular dithers are almost perfectly flat, however that doesn’t mean they are less effective.

Ideally this gives the producer the flexibility to choose the dithering that best suits their material on a song by song basis.  But again, this noise is so incredibly quiet that for most music, you’ll never hear it.  Which is ideal anyway, as dither was created to be as inaudible as possible in the first place.  I’ll admit that as a mastering engineer, even I rarely audition different dithers, since with most material there’s no audible difference anyway.

Once in awhile I’ll get a very dynamic song with lots of quiet passages, certain ambient or even orchestral songs fit this category.  In those cases I might try out a few different dithering options, though even then the differences can be almost impossible to hear, even in my studio.

The point of all this is make you realize that while dithering does fulfill a useful role in the audio production process, it’s arguably the least important aspect and isn’t something people should worry too much about.  Certainly add dither if you can when you’re rendering your mixdown or master to a 16bit file at the end of the writing process, but don’t lose sleep over which dithering option is the best.  The differences are incredibly subtle, even to those people with well-trained hearing, and in almost all cases the dither is so far below the noise floor of any playback chain that no one will hear what dither you used, or even if you used it at all.

I hope this helped you not only understand why we use dither, but also highlight some of the differences in the various options available to us.

Peace and beats,
Tarekith

We’ve Arrived

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It took 4 days of driving across the US, 1 record snow storm in Chicago, 2 flight delays, 14 hours stuck on a plane, 3 hours of hair-raising driving in Germany, along with whole bunch of other adventures, but at long last we have arrived in Luxembourg!

The journey has been tiring more than anything, long days learning to adapt in a country where you don’t speak the language(s) combined with jet lag will do that though.  This first week has been mainly getting ourselves integrated into a new government, learning new rules of the road, trying to find places to get food, and working on getting the last of my business change completed.

Oh yeah, the week before we left Seattle I converted my Inner Portal Studio business from a sole-proprietor based company to an LLC corporation.  I mean, why do things the easy way?  🙂  Mainly on the advice of other business owners I talked to who moved overseas, hopefully it means less issues with the Luxembourg government when it’s tax time.  It was something I was planning on doing in 2015 anyway before we decided to move, so other than the stress of trying to get it all done before we headed overseas, no surprises there.

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At the moment we’re in temporary housing in a hotel until our apartment is ready at the beginning of March.  The good news is that it took us less than a week to find a place to live for the next two years, and it’s a brand new building with incredibly thick walls so I can still work from “home” for my mastering business.  Well, once all my gear arrives sometime in April anyway.  The bad news is that I’m finding it really hard to make any music or be creative in a location like this.  Lots of noise from other people in the hotel, and there’s a TON of construction in Luxembourg during the day near where we are staying.

A least I have the electribe with me though, and since it’s battery powered, I’ll be able to take it just about anywhere once I find some good places to get away for a bit.  Plus it provides hours of childish fun when I get bored.  🙂

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Aside from trying to get a new live set written, I’m hoping to finally make some more progress on my audio production book.  Hopefully when we move into the new apartment in 3 weeks, things will be quieter and more conducive to creative writing.  I was never one of those people who could zone out in a busy coffee shop for instance.

Well, that’s about it for now.  Just wanted to give everyone a quick update on my move!

De paix et battements,
Tarekith

We’re Off!

Well, the movers came on Friday and packed up the house and my studio, and luckily it went very well.  I felt bad for the guy assigned to my room though, it by far had the heaviest items, oops.  🙂

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Of course, I couldn’t stop working until the very end, but at least I had a guard dog to keep the movers away until the very end.  Definitely a bit sad to leave the room I’ve come to know so well behind, but I’m hopeful the next space will be even better.

A few last things to take care of in Seattle, then we start our journey to Chicago, and finally to Luxembourg.  The weather in Seattle is unseasonably warm, mid-60’s (15C) in January.  At least with the house all packed, we have a little bit of free time.  It was nice getting to sit outside and jam with the new electribe a couple times over the last few days.  Really enjoying this little box, some of the sounds I’m getting are amazing.

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At this rate I’ll have enough patterns written by the time we get to Luxembourg that I’ll have both a more uptempo set ready to go, as well as a more chill downtempo set.  Good stuff, now I have to figure out how I’ll do transitions, hmm…

Until next time, peace and beats.
Tarekith

And That’s A Wrap!

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Well, it was a bit of a marathon session this week trying to get everyone’s projects wrapped up before the shut down, but I’m happy to say everything is done and it’s time to start packing.  Well, I’m not happy about having to pack up the studio, but it’ll be nice to have one less thing to worry about before the movers come on Friday.

So, as of now, Inner Portal Studio is officially closed for approximately 8 weeks.  I’ll be sure to post when I’m ready to start accepting tracks for mastering again.  In the meantime you can follow me on Facebook if you want to keep up with the move, and setting up a studio in a new country:

https://www.facebook.com/ErikMagrini.Tarekith

I want to thank everyone who offered good wishes with the move, it’s been great working with you all over the last few years!

Peace and beats,
Erik